Bibliometrics from a wide range of perspectives

Three days, 37 lecture presentations, 16 poster presentations and 141 participants from 16 countries. The annual Nordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy (NWB) brought the most recent currents of bibliometrics from the Nordic countries and from across Europe to the House of Science and Letters in Helsinki.

The House of Science and Letters in Helsinki was the venue for the 22nd NWB. Photo by Jussi S. Männistö (JSM)

The presentations during the three days from 8–10 November offered a wide range of perspectives on bibliometrics, from mathematical formulae to research policies and the societal impact of science [see the NWB program, incl. abstracts). Many presentations took the perspective of open science, and citation curves favoring OA articles were a common sight. All presentation material will be published in Figshare in the coming days.

According to Kim Holmberg, altmetrics provides a good insight into the activity of researchers, but not directly to the quality of research. (JSM)

The actual workshop sessions on Thursday and Friday were preceded by Wednesday’s pre-workshop event, which attracted the full hall to the upper floor of the House of Science and Letters. In the pre-workshop’s keynote speech, Kim Holmberg from the RUSE research unit discussed measuring researchers’ online visibility, especially altmetrics.

During the event, NWB tweeters were active on Twitter, and on Thursday #NWB2017 rose momentarily to the top 20 hashtags in Finland along with #Catalonia and #peräkonttigate.

Declining share of Nordic publications

In Thursday’s keynote speech, Fredrik Niclas Piro from the Nordic Institute for Studies in Innovation, Research and Education (NIFU) went through the findings of a recent NordForsk report on Nordic higher education institutions. Comparing Research at Nordic Higher Education Institutions using Bibliometric Indicators was published this year and covers the period 1999 to 2014.

In his speech Piro discussed measurement issues and the differences the report reveales between the Nordic countries. He emphasized that the purpose of the report is to provide higher education institutions with information for developing their research activities. However, the actual use of the report is university-specific.

NordForsk report is not about ranking, but about providing information for comparison, says Fredrik Niclas Piro. (JSM)

“Many universities say that yes, we have read the report and we use it some way. In some cases the use of the report is very specific. For example, one university uses it in their development contract with the Ministry. These reports are useful for many purposes, but the benchmarking of other institutions is the main thing. The report is not about ranking, but about providing information for comparison,” claims Piro.

The comparison shows that although the number of publications in Nordic countries is rising sharply, its global share in production is falling. From the Nordic countries’ point of view, the strong fields in international comparison are the social sciences, business studies, economics, and the health sciences. In Finland, certain areas of medicine are declining in comparison with other Nordic countries.

“Research in the Nordic countries is growing in the social sciences and health-related fields. But in the natural sciences, we are declining. Finland is a bit different. Its growth in material science, geosciences and also mathematics and statistics is higher than in other Nordic countries. But on the other hand, the growth of biomedicine and clinical medicine in Finland was negative from 1999 to 2014. That’s very unique,” says Piro.

Research culture eroding scientific credibility

In Friday’s keynote speech, Jesper Schneider from Aarhus University discussed the phenomenon of science crisis. Schneider pointed out that it is easy to find strong opinions on the subject, but verifying these views is another case. Instead of scientific scams, Schneider focused on questionable research practices (QRP).

The grey area of questionable research practices requires a lot more research, claims Jesper Schneider. (JSM)

“Fraud cases are rare. Questionable research practices are the grey area, and are frequently overlooked because they don’t seem as serious as misconduct. But the total effect of biases and misuses could really have a huge influence on scientific results. This grey area ranges from sloppy research to errors and biases, and at some point, it becomes a legal issue,” claims Schneider.

According to Schneider, questionable research practices vary by discipline, organization and country. Schneider specifically discussed the problem of reproducibility of research in the soft sciences, i.e. in social and human sciences.

The pressure to publish more and more, and fierce competition – or “perverse incentives in academic capitalism” – are potential causes of the science crisis. However, Schneider emphasizes that the phenomenon requires a lot more research, because the current knowledge basis is hugely incomplete. He argues that further research is worthwhile, as the credibility of science is at stake.

Best moment at NWB?

Hans Jessen Hansen. Kuva: Juuso Ala-Kyyny (JAK)

So, three days of bibliometrics – what was the best moment? According to Hans Jessen Hansen from the Danish Ministry of Higher Education and Science, the two keynote speeches by Fredrik Niclas Piro and Jesper Schneider summarized shortly above.

“They had a little bit more time, so they got into their subjects more deeply. As for those two presentations, I wrote notes about all the presentations I saw,” says Hansen.

Julie Riisom Wisborg from the University Library of Southern Denmark emphasized the social dimension of the event; the importance of encounters.

Julie Riisom Wisborg. (JAK)

“I’m impressed by the very friendly atmosphere here. I did my poster presentation on Thursday, and the comments and questions were great. I think this sort of event gives you totally new possibilities to interact with people you wouldn’t interact with on the internet. And you learn things you wouldn’t even think to look for,” says Riisom Wisborg.

Gunnar Sivertsen from the Norwegian NIFU research institute was the chairman in two NWB sessions and also participated in two presentations.

Gunnar Sivertsen. (JAK)

“It’s difficult to pick out what one best thing, because it’s a combination of presentations and discussions, also discussions outside the formal sessions. So, what I appreciate most is the networking, new contacts and new ideas. This has been one of the most well-organized workshops, so I’d like to congratulate the organizers,” says Sivertsen.

Even though Wi-Fi didn’t work?

“It was even better without Wi-Fi, because we could concentrate more on the here and now,” says Sivertsen.

Next year in Borås

The Nordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy has been held since 1996, that is, 22 times so far. This year’s workshop was organized by a consortium consisting of the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies (TSV), Helsinki University Library (HULib) and the University of Tampere Research Centre for Knowledge, Science, Technology and Innovation Studies (TaSTI).

HULib was also present on stage: Eva Isaksson discussed the evaluation of research publications in astronomy and astrophysics, Susanna Nykyri introduced research data metrics from the University of Helsinki’s perspective and Terhi Sandgren asked in her presentation, “Are publication databases suitable for studying the publishing practices of a multidisciplinary research field at subdisciplinary level?”

Next year the event will take place in Borås, Sweden. Lycka till!

See the seminar on Twitter


Research Data Management Planning is worthwhile

Many of the researchers at the University of Helsinki that applied for funding from the Academy of Finland in the fall of 2016 used a web-based tool, DMPTuuli, when writing their data management plans.   137 researchers received funding in the spring of 2017.  Of these 64 percent had registered in DMPTuuli, which is administered by the Helsinki University Library.

Applying for funding is an everyday task for researchers. From 2016 the Academy of Finland has demanded that funding applications contain a data management plan as a separate appendix. The DMPTuuli, a tool for facilitating the writing of data management plans, was created by the Finnish Tuuli project on the iniative of the Helsinki university library.

DMPTuuli is based on the idea that the web form with templates and guidelines for different funders and organisations help researchers plan and document data management through the different stages of their research project.  This way questions about copyright, data security, and reuse of data are considered.

Get guidance on DMPworkshops

Information Specialist Mikko Ojanen and DMPWorkshop, Spring 2017. Picture: Jussi Männistö

Researchers get guidance in the use of DMPTuuli and information about services and the benefits of data management in the data management workshops of the University of Helsinki DataSupport. These workshops have been very popular. Several hundred researchers have participated in them. The library is the coordinator of the DataSupport and also one of the providers of expertise.  The university’s DataSupport  answers questions about data management both during funding application rounds and outside them.

DataSupport can be reached by email at researchdata@helsinki.fi and by phone at 02 941 23000.

Translation: Monica Allardt

On Trial: Encyclopedia of Arabic Language and Linguistics until 8.12

Encyclopedia of Arabic Language and Linguistics is available in University of Helsinki until 8.12.

The Encyclopedia of Arabic Language and Linguistics Online comprehensively covers all aspects of Arabic languages and linguistics. It is interdisciplinary in scope and represents different schools and approaches. The Encyclopedia of Arabic Language and Linguistics Online is cross-searchable and cross-referenced, and is equipped with a browsable index. All relevant fields in Arabic linguistics, both general and language specific are covered and the Encyclopedia of Arabic Language and Linguistics Online includes topics from interdisciplinary fields, such as anthropology, psychology, sociology, philosophy, and computer science.

Feedback you can write to e-library@helsinki.fi

Kaisa House goes WhatsApp

Have you spotted something wrong in premises or devices at Kaisa House? The printer jammed, guest computer not working? You are not able to solve the situation? Now you can send a message also via WhatsApp!

The Kaisa customer service tests WhatsApp in November and December 2017. We read the messages during the customer service hours, Mon-Fri 10 AM -7 PM, Sat 11 AM – 5 PM. The number you’ll find on posters and info-TV when you visit the library.

The WhatsApp number is only for matters concerning premises and devices. We do not renew loans or answer questions about the collections via the app. Please do not send your personal details (e.g. social security number) via WhatsApp. Also note that we are not always able to answer immediately.

WhatsApp

Opening hours on All Saints’ Day

The library has exceptions to regular opening hours on All Saints’ Day:

On Friday November 3th
– Main Library Kaisa House open 8 am – 6 pm, customer service 10 am – 6 pm
– Kumpula Campus Library open 9 am – 4 pm, customer service 10 am – 4 pm
– Meilahti Campus Library Terkko open 8 am – 8 pm, customer service 10 am – 4 pm
– Viikki Campus Library open 9 am – 4 pm, customer service 10 am – 4 pm
– Learning Centre Aleksandria 8 am – 5:45 pm
– Learning Centre Minerva 8 am – 5:45 pm.

Libraries and learning centres are closed on Saturday November 4th and Sunday November 5th.

On Trial: GALE Scholar Latin America & the Caribbean until 13.11.

Gale Scholar: Latin America & the Caribbean brings together in a single place a  collection of primary source documents about Latin America and the Caribbean; academic journals and news feeds covering the region; reference articles and commentary; maps and statistics; audio and video.

The following topics are included: Agriculture, Arts and Letters, Biographies, Business and Economics, Conquest and Exploration, Countries and Civilizations, Environment and Conservation, Government, Politics, and Law, International Affairs, Society and Culture, War and Diplomacy.

Feedback you can write: e-library@helsinki.fi

OPEN SCIENCE KIOSK on every Campus October 24-27

OPEN SCIENCE KIOSK

Venues & Time
City Centre Campus

Tue 24.10.2017 11.00-13.00 Porthania, lobby Yliopistonkatu 3

Meilahti Campus
Tue 24.10.2017 11.00-13.00 Biomedicum Helsinki 1 lobby, Haartmaninkatu 8

Kumpula Campus
Tue 24.10.2017 11.00-13.00 Physicum, lobby Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2

Viikki Campus
Fri 27.10.2017 11.00-13.00 Biocenter 3, Viikinkaari 1

To whom?

Researcher, lecturer or student: You are welcome to meet our experts whether you just want to discuss matters concerning Open Access or get more detailed advice.

Why?

Want to get yourself an ORCID id and link it with your TUHAT profile? Aiming to publish your research or thesis open access? Wish to hear more about discounts on APCs library has negotiated? Or is it about the data: Do you hope to manage your data / write a Research Data Management Plan?

Come and challenge us & explore the possibilities!

OPEN ACCESS WEEK 2017

On Trial: Academic Video Online until 30.11.2017

Academic Video Online delivers more than 62,000 multidisciplinary video titles including 17,000 exclusive to Alexander Street. The depth of content and breadth of content-types (such as documentaries, films, demonstrations, etc) in Academic Video Online makes it a useful resource for all types of patrons.

The content is following:

Art & Design

Diversity

Health Sciences

History

Literature & Language

Music & Performing Arts

Psychology & Counseling

Science & Engineering

Social Sciences

For more information about the content included in this collection, click HERE.

Feedback: e-library@helsinki.fi