Category Archives: Events

“Working With Cultural Objects and Manuscripts: Provenance, Legality, and Responsible Stewardship” (Helsinki, 5-6 June)

The symposium takes place on Monday 5 and Tuesday 6 June 2017 in the premises of the National Museum of Finland, Helsinki.

Registration is free and open until 28 May 2017. Go to registration form here.

Programme

Monday, June 5

9:30-10:00 Registration & Coffee
10:00-11:00 SESSION 1: Welcome & Introduction to the Issues
10:00-10:10 Elina Anttila (National Museum of Finland)
Opening words
10:10-10:30 Suzie Thomas & Visa Immonen (University of Helsinki)
Working with Cultural Objects and Manuscripts in a Finnish Context: Reflections on Issues and Possibilities
10:30-11:00 Jussi Nuorteva (National Archives of Finland; Finnish National Commission for UNESCO; UNESCO International Advisory Committee for the Memory of the World Programme)
UNESCO Memory of the World Programme and Measures to Safeguard Documentary Heritage
11:00-13:00 Lunch
13:00-15:30 SESSION 2: Museums
13:00-14:00 Keynote Speaker: Magnus Olofsson (Swedish National Heritage Board; Vasa Museum; ICOM Nord)
Cooperation, ethics and the need for new legislation – 
Some examples of how Sweden works to prevent cultural heritage crime”
14:00-14:30 Anni Guttorm (Siida Museum, Inari)
Homecoming: Experiences of Sámi Object Repatriations at the Sámi Museum Siida
14:30-15:00 Susanna Pettersson (Ateneum National Gallery)
“Acquiring fine arts: trade, ownership and provenance”
15:00-15:30 Nida Dandashi (University of Helsinki)
The Archaeological Museum of Homs and its Collection: Past and Present
15:30-16:00 Coffee Break
16:00-18:30 SESSION 3: Academia
16:00-17:00 Keynote Speaker: Christopher Rollston (George Washington University)
Flotsam and Jetsam: Salvage Work in a Sea of Forged and Pillaged Inscriptions
17:00-17:30 Damien Huffer (Stockholm University)
“Bodies in the Lab, Skulls on the Mantlepiece: Studying Human Remains in Academia, from Online Markets to Teaching Collections” 
17:30-18:00 Åke Engsheden (Stockholm University)
Bits and Pieces from Monastic Life in Late Antique Egypt: Coptic Ostraca in Museum Gustavianum, Uppsala”
18:00-18:30 Sanna Aro-Valjus (University of Helsinki)
The Allure of Touch, the Desire to Possess: Finnish Assyriologists and Cuneiform Tablets
19:30-21:30 Speakers’ dinner

Tuesday, June 6

9:00-9:30 Coffee
9:30-11:30 SESSION 4: Government
9:30-10:30 Keynote Speaker: Patty Gerstenblith (DePaul University)
Looting of Archaeological Sites amid Armed Conflict: Government and Legal Responses”
10:30-11:00 Raila Kataja (National Board of Antiquities; National Museum of Finland)
The Reality of Exporting Cultural Goods: The Point of Views of the Licensing Authority
11:00-11:30 Josephine Munch Rasmussen (Norwegian Institute of Cultural Heritage Research)
“Illicit trade in Cultural objects and manuscripts: stakeholder responses”
11:30-12:00 Eero Ehanti (National Museum of Finland; ICOM Finland)
Privileges and Responsibilities: Views on Museum Ethics
12:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00-17:00 SESSION 5: A Way Forward for Finland and the World (roundtable discussion)
14:00-15:00 Keynote Speaker: Neil Brodie (University of Oxford)
“Unprovenanced Objects in the Twenty-First Century: Policies and Problems”
15:00-15:45 Open discussion
15:45-16:15 Coffee break
16:15-17:00 Open discussion
17:00-18:00 Reception at National Museum of Finland (hosted by the City of Helsinki)

 

Famous top scholars in the Soisalon-Soininen symposium

More information on programme and registration for the conference can be found here.

Professor Ilmari Soisalon-Soininen (1917–2002) is best known for his research on the syntax of the Septuagint, the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible. One of the distinct traits of the Septuagint is its nature as a translation from a Semitic language to an Indo-European one. Actually, many of the books included in the Septuagint have different translations whose style and degree of literalism vary greatly. The translators can be characterized by their choice of renderings in such Hebrew structures that can be rendered in many different ways in different contexts. Some of the translators of the Septuagint aimed at rendering a certain Hebrew grammatical structure by a fixed Greek structure as often as possible, sometimes producing unidiomatic Greek or an obscure meaning. Thus the syntax of the translation is partly governed by the source language. Soisalon-Soininen did pioneering work in taking this aspect fully into account by his translation-technical methodology. Continue reading Famous top scholars in the Soisalon-Soininen symposium

Soisalon-Soininen Symposium on the Septuagint (June 1-4, Helsinki): Registration + Programme

The international Soisalon-Soininen Symposium on the Septuagint focuses on the Greek language of the Septuagint and is organized in memory of Ilmari Soisalon-Soininen and in celebration of his 100th birthday on June 4, 2017. The symposium is organized by the Centre of Excellence “Changes in Sacred Texts and Traditions,” Faculty of Theology, University of Helsinki. Continue reading Soisalon-Soininen Symposium on the Septuagint (June 1-4, Helsinki): Registration + Programme

CSTT Annual Meeting “Tradition” (10-13 May, Tvärminne)

Location: Tvärminne, May 10-13, 2017

Wednesday, May 10

4:00 – 5:00pm: Jessi Orpana, Plenary Session on Defining ‘Tradition’

Session 1 (Keynote 1)
5:00 – 7:00pm: Eva Mroczek (UC Davis)
“Censored and Salvaged: Theories of Scriptural Survival in Ancient Judaism and Christianity”
[Responses by four teams with discussion, moderated by Jutta Jokiranta, Helen Dixon, Ville Mäkipelto, and Miika Tucker]

7:00 – 8:00pm: Dinner

Thursday, May 11

Session 2: (Keynote 2; Chair Katja Kujanpää)
9:00 – 11:30pm: Seth Sanders (UC Davis)
“Memory Without History, Art Without Intention: The Unique Problem of Pentateuchal Tradition” [Reinhard Müller and Hanna Tervanotko, respondents]

12:00 – 1:00pm: Lunch

Session 3: Scribes and Other Cultural Transmitters
1:00-2:00pm: Martti Nissinen, “CSTT Seen through Scribal Culture” (discussion)
2:00-3:00pm: Raija Mattila, “Your First Day at School (in Mesopotamia)” (workshop)

3:00 – 3:30pm: Coffee break

Session 4: Ritual (Chair Tero Alstola)
3:30-4:15pm: Gina Konstantopoulos, “Tradition and Transmission in Mesopotamian Incantations” [Timo Tekoniemi, respondent]
4:15-5:00pm: Jutta Jokiranta“Transmission of Traditions in Rituals from Cognitive Science of Religion Perspective” [Ville Mäkipelto, respondent]
5:00-6:00pm: Helen Dixon, Ritual workshop – title TBD

6:00 – 7:00pm: Dinner

Friday, May 12

Session 5
9:30-10:30am: Jason Silverman, “Amateur Anthropology of Foreign Traditions” (workshop)
10:30-11:30am: Isaak de Hulster, “Female Form: Generally Human, Traditional, or Contextual?” (workshop)

11:30 – 11.45am: CSTT photo (Ville)

11:45am – 12:45pm: Lunch

Session 6: Gender (Chair Hanna Tervanotko)
12:45 – 1:30pm: Jessica Keady, “Troubling the Purity Tradition: The Positions of Idealism, Impurity, and Masculinities in the Dead Sea Scrolls” [Jessi Orpana, respondent]
1:30 – 3:00pm: Saana Svärd and Hanna Tervanotko, “CSTT, Gender, and Tradition” workshop [with Anneli Aejmelaeus, Francis Borchardt, and Rick Bonnie; Eva Mroczek and Seth Sanders, respondents]

3:00 – 5:00pm: Afternoon break

Session 7 (Chair Mika Pajunen)
5:00 – 6:00pm: Joanna Töyräänvuori, “Tradition and Modernity in Light of the Linear Theory of Social Change” (workshop)
6:00 – 7:00pm: Elisa Uusimäki, Panel discussion on postdoc projects

7:00 – 8:30pm: Dinner

Saturday, May 13

9:00 – 10:00am: Ville Mäkipelto, Blogging workshop

10:00 – 12:00pm: Session 8: Wrap Up
– Reflections by Helen Dixon, Christoph Levin, Eva Mroczek, Seth Sanders, and Martti Nissinen
– Team reports and plans + CSTT meetings discussions

12:00 – 1:00pm: Lunch and check out

Workshop: “Social-Scientific Theorizing and Biblical Studies” (26-27 April, Helsinki)

Place: Faculty Room 5th floor, Vuorikatu 3, Faculty of Theology

Wednesday 26 April

10:00‒12:00 Prof. David Chalcraft (Liverpool John Moores University)
The most useful sociologist(s) to think with in Biblical Studies (depending on the task in hand)

13:30‒14:30 Dr. Jessica Keady (University of Helsinki)
From PhD to Postdoctoral Studies: Gender, Purity, Performance, and Positioning in the Dead Sea Scrolls

14:30‒15:00 coffee

15:00‒16:00 Dr. Jason Silverman (University of Helsinki)
The Socio-Political Implications of Language Choice: Towards Analyzing Persian Period Judaean Communication using the Sociolinguistic Concepts of “Code-Switching” and “Code- Mixing”.

Thursday 27 April

9:00‒10:00 Dr. Joanna Töyräänvuori (University of Helsinki)
How to Study Strategies Used by Minority Cultures in Dealing with Oppressive Ideological Messages in the Ancient World

10:00‒11:00 Dr. Jessi Orpana (University of Helsinki)
On Cultural Negotiation

11:00‒12:00 Dr. Doc. Jutta Jokiranta (University of Helsinki)
On the Fuzzy ‘Authority’ & Conclusions

16:15‒18:00 CSTT Lecture Series: Prof. David J. Chalcraft, (Liverpool John Moores University)
Moving Through Texts: The Rituals of Reading and the Sociology of Mobility

Women and the Bible: a Wikipedia Story

 By Rick Bonnie and Helen Dixon

Last week Friday’s Wikipedia edit-a-thon on “Women and the bible” was a great success. The edit-a-thon was organized by the CSTT and was open for all faculty and students of Helsinki’s Faculty of Theology. (If you’re unfamiliar with what an “edit-a-thon” is and would like to know more, check out this site.) And, though we were only around a dozen in number, the participants from Theology and the volunteers of Wikimedia Suomi created and edited around a dozen of entries in the Finnish and English Wikipedia. Continue reading Women and the Bible: a Wikipedia Story

Naiset ja Raamattu: Wikipedian kertomana

By Rick Bonnie and Helen Dixon (translated by Ville Mäkipelto)

Viime viikon perjantaina järjestetty ”Naiset ja Raamattu” Wikipedian muokkausilta (”edit-a-thon”) oli menestys. Tapahtuman järjesti Pyhät tekstit ja traditiot muutoksessa -huippuyksikkö ja se oli avoin kaikille Helsingin Teologisen tiedekunnan henkilökunnan jäsenille ja opiskelijoille. Huolimatta siitä, että paikalla oli vain noin tusina ihmistä, osallistujat ja Wikimedia Suomen vapaaehtoiset loivat ja täydensivät kymmeniä artikkeleita suomen- ja englanninkieliseen Wikipediaan. Continue reading Naiset ja Raamattu: Wikipedian kertomana

Wikipedia edit-a-thon “Women and the Bible”

The CSTT organises a Wikipedia edit-a-thon, open to the entire Faculty of Theology, on the theme of “women and the bible,” in honor of International Women’s Day (March 8). The event will be held Friday, March 10 in the 5th floor faculty hall (Vuorikatu 3)2:30pm – 6pm (or later if people want to stay on).  The CSTT will provide training for everyone to edit Wikipedia at the event with help of Wikimedia Finland volunteers.

Research has shown that ca. 90 percent of Wikipedia editors are male. This has a profound impact upon what content is being created and updated on this influential encyclopedia. As Wikipedia is the most used encyclopedia and is often the first place that high school pupils, university students, and laypeople look for information, addressing this gender imbalance is of high importance.

Together, on March 10, we plan to improve both the Wikipedia pages on female Finnish biblical scholars and on women in biblical literature, in a social and casual atmosphere. The CSTT will provide an assortment of snacks and celebratory drinks.

You are very welcome to join us! Please register (for free) here, so we can keep an accurate headcount: https://goo.gl/forms/hevMVDbLU29o55mp1.

 

Report on the “Second Workshop on Gender, Methodology and the Ancient Near East”

By Saana Svärd and Agnès Garcia-Ventura

The “Second Workshop on Gender, Methodology and the Ancient Near East” took place in Barcelona February 1-3, 2017. The workshop was hosted by IPOA, the Institute of Ancient Near Eastern Studies of the University of Barcelona (Spain), and organized in cooperation with the Centre of Excellence in “Changes in Sacred Texts and Traditions” (University of Helsinki, Finland). Organizers were Agnès Garcia-Ventura (IPOA, University of Barcelona) and Saana Svärd (University of Helsinki). The workshop was a continuation of the “First Workshop on Gender, Methodology and the Ancient Near East.” The first workshop was organized by the same two scholars at the University of Helsinki in October 2014 and hosted by the Centre of Excellence in “Changes in Sacred Texts and Traditions.”

The aim of both meetings was to discuss different methodological and theoretical approaches to gender within the framework of ancient Near Eastern studies (including archaeology, art history and text studies) and to enable fruitful dialogue between these approaches. Moreover, for this second workshop, colleagues from neighboring disciplines were also encouraged to submit proposals, in order to enrich these conversations further. As a result, the second workshop included colleagues from the disciplines of Assyriology, Archaeology, Egyptology, Phoenician and Punic studies, and Biblical studies (see the full program).

The conference lasted three days and featured 33 communications, a poster session where six posters were presented, and a projects panel where nine new and ongoing projects where discussed. The event was well attended and all in all included roughly 90 participants, including speakers and poster presenters. The speakers and poster presenters came from various universities in twelve countries, namely Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Japan, Malta, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America.

The results of such a rich and diverse conference cannot be summed up in a short blog post. Suffice it to say here that the sheer chronological, geographical and methodological scope, as well as the general high quality of papers, promises good things for the future of gender studies within the context of ancient Near Eastern studies.

The organizers: Agnès Garcia-Ventura and Saana Svärd

Since both workshops have been well received and the number of participants has increased, the organizers decided to plan a third workshop in the series, hoping the initiative will have continuity as a biannual conference. Thus, the third edition of the meeting, co-organized in cooperation with Professor Katrien De Graef, will be hosted by the University of Ghent (Belgium) in 2019. More information will be published in due time. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions and/or if you want us to keep you posted on other future ventures related to gender studies and ancient Near Eastern studies we may launch. You may contact us at: agnes.ventura[AT]gmail.com or saana.svard[AT]helsinki.fi.

Samuel-Kings Editors’ Workshop (Thu 12 Jan, Helsinki)

On 12.–14.1.2017 the University of Helsinki will host the Samuel-Kings Editors’ Workshop which will bring together the critical edition projects of The Göttingen Septuagint and The Hebrew Bible – A Critical Edition (HBCE) on the Books of Samuel and Kings. The workshop sessions will consist of hands-on work with practical text-critical issues. As both projects aim at establishing a critical, eclectic text – the closest attainable approximation to the archetype – the focus will be especially on the most difficult critical decisions.

As a part of the workshop, on Thursday 12.1.2017 18:00–19:30, there will be an opportunity for everyone interested in textual research to get to know the five projects, their goals and their methods, their problems and their discoveries.

Venue: Faculty of Theology, Faculty Hall (Fabianinkatu 24, 5th floor)

18:00–19:00 — Short presentations:
– Göttingen 1 Samuel (Anneli Aejmelaeus, Helsinki)
– Göttingen 2 Samuel (Tuukka Kauhanen, Helsinki)
– Göttingen 1–2 Kings (Pablo Torijano, Madrid)
– HBCE 1 Kings (Jan Joosten, Oxford)
– HBCE 2 Kings (Andrés Piquer, Madrid)

19:00–19:30 — Discussion

For more information, please contact: tuukka.kauhanen@helsinki.fi