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CFC: Chinese rural schooling: Good practices for successful social justice

Call for chapters

Chinese rural schooling: Good practices for successful social justice

Eds.: Yongjian Li (RUC, China), Fred Dervin (University of Helsinki, Finland) &

Shibao Guo (University of Calgary, Canada)

Deadline for abstracts: 15 November 2017

Volume to be published by Palgrave Macmillan in the Palgrave Studies on Chinese Education in a Global Perspective (Eds. Dervin/Du)

The word rural can have different meanings in different contexts. In this volume, we are interested in rural schooling in Mainland China. In the Middle Kingdom, rural schooling can both refer to the educational experiences of migrant children in Chinese urban contexts and to those of children who live and study in Chinese rural areas. Migrant children (also referred to as ‘floating children’, Li, 1995) often follow the 282 million rural migrant workers employed in an urban workplace (2015, National Bureau of Statistics). Since 2001 rural migrant children have been allowed to attend urban public schools regardless of their household registration (Hukou, 户口). Although progress has been made in promoting access to public schools many migrant children attend private schools sponsored by local communities or private business institutions. While Chinese and national scientific literatures have concentrated on the case of these migrant children, fewer studies have been published on the experiences of children based in rural areas. It is important to note that many migrant workers leave their children behind. In 2010, more than 61 million children between birth and 17 years old were “left behind” (Chinese National Census).

This volume is interested in how these two kinds of rural schooling promote successful social justice for the children. The focus can be based on a macro-perspective (e.g. policy-level) and/or micro-level (e.g. students’, teachers’, principals’ perspectives, amongst others). According to Yang, Huang and Liu’s (2014) article “An analysis of education inequality in China”, a sharp decrease in education inequality has been witnessed in China thanks to e.g. the education expansion policy of the last decades. They note, however, that the rural-urban division is still deep in China esp. in terms of educational achievement.

Most publications on Chinese rural schooling tend to concentrate on negative aspects and to generalise somewhat about what it means to be either a student in a rural school or a migrant student in an urban context. In volume, we wish to examine what we call Good practises for successful social justice in rural schooling in China, and thus look at this multifaceted educational context from a more positive perspective. We believe that many schools around China are doing their best to ensure that rural children’s educational experiences give them a boost in life and for their future life.

To the editors, social justice refers to the explicit efforts made by school leaders, teachers, with the local community and beyond, to make sure that rural students are given opportunities to succeed at school and in their future lives. These efforts can include tackling the following issues (amongst others):

–               Help students increase their level of participation in school and beyond

–               Implement equality-equity measures in the school context

–               Help students integrate in the school context and beyond by building up a sense of belonging and fighting against alienation, marginalization or disenfranchisement

–               Fight against different forms of discrimination against rural students and pass onto them skills to counter-attack such wicked problems to empower them

–               Reduce the number of dropouts

–               Diminish gender differences in achievement

–               Support rural students struggling with mental health issues.

Prospective authors can examine any of these aspects of social justice in Chinese rural schooling – or other aspects – by concentrating on how these have been implemented short-term or long-term in a specific school context (rural/migrants in urban contexts). More specifically authors could look into the following social justice strategies (amongst others): the implementation of special education needs; specific forms of pedagogical practices; the use of technology for social justice; the building of relationships between schools, parents (grandparents too in the case of children “left behind”) and students; pre- service or in-service training to help teachers work with rural children (work on teachers’ expectations and stereotypes, etc.).

Deadlines

Abstract of proposed chapter (300 words): 15 November 2017

Full chapters to be submitted: 15 April 2018

Authors are invited to submit a 300-word proposal (including a few lines about the author(s)) in English to the editors (404385534@qq.com, fred.dervin@helsinki.fi, guos@ucalgary.ca) – please no pdf!

The proposals should clearly explain the theoretical positioning and concerns of the proposed chapter, and include a short description of data (where applicable). A basic bibliography may also be added.

Prospective authors should note that only original and previously unpublished articles will be considered.

All article submissions of 5,500 to 8,000 words will be forwarded to 2 members of the volume scientific committee. Final decision regarding acceptance/revision/rejection will be based on the reviews received from the reviewers.

CFC: TRANSNATIONAL EDUCATION EXPORTS AND IMPORTS THE SEARCH FOR THE CHINESE EL DORADO

Call for chapters

TRANSNATIONAL EDUCATION EXPORTS AND IMPORTS

THE SEARCH FOR THE CHINESE EL DORADO

Eds. Fred Dervin (University of Helsinki), Xiangyun Du (Aalborg University) & Zhao Ke (SHUFE)

Deadline for abstracts: 20th November 2017

Volume to be published by Palgrave Macmillan in the Palgrave Studies on Chinese Education in a Global Perspective (Eds. Dervin/Du)

 

It has become a truism to say that education is now a global business. It is marketised, sold and consumed across borders, in multifaceted forms. Like most countries around the world, China has witnessed education as an import and, increasingly, an export sector. Through her driving growth, China is engaging in selling and buying knowledge-based products and services, sending and attracting students, and setting up international branches locally and internationally.

 

Some examples:

– More than half a million Chinese students study abroad every year. In Australia, for instance, Chinese students accounted for 27% of all Australian education export earnings in 2016.

– At home, Chinese universities are hiring foreign expects and attracting an increasing number of international students. In 2015, there were 397,635 international students from 202 countries and regions (in comparison to 100,000 in 2004). They studied in a wide range of geographic areas within China: for example, in 2015 31 provinces and regions received international students, the top three being Beijing, Shanghai and Zhejiang provinces (MOE, 2016). China is also involved in franchising, twinning degrees activities as well as programme articulations and branch campuses.

– China’s so-called soft-power diplomacy has also led to the creation of culture and language schools and Confucius Institutes around the world. These institutions contribute highly to exporting and importing many and varied forms of education.

– The first overseas university founded by a Chinese university was founded in the capital of Laos by Soochow University in 2011.  International Economy and Trade, International Finance but also Chinese and Computer Science and are offered at the satellite campus. Xiamen University Malaysia opened its doors in 2016 in Kuala Lumpur, offering bachelor degree courses in Chinese studies, journalism, digital media technology, Traditional Chinese Medicine, amongst others. This was the first overseas branch of a top tier Chinese university. One of the best Chinese universities, Peking University, is opening a branch of its HSBC Business School in Oxford in 2017, having bought Foxcombe Hall in the city.

– Finally, math textbooks imported from Shanghai will be used in the UK in 2017. According to the managing director for Collins Learning, the education division of HarperCollins, “they’re producing content that is of a fantastically high quality.” Real Shanghai Mathematics consists of a Teacher Guide, Textbook and Pupil Practice Book for each Year (1-6). It “emphasises complete mastery of basic numeracy knowledge and skills to allow vastly accelerated progression through to advanced numeracy”. The British government has allocated $71-million to train teachers in the methods used in Chinese schools.

 

For this volume, potential authors may submit a proposal about the following issues – or other relevant issues related to education exports and imports to and from China:

-Policy analysis related to transnational education exports/imports

-Success and/or failure of transnational education exports/imports (concrete impact, who benefits?, hidden agendas)

-Impact on individuals, knowledge, locality and any other relevant aspects

-Intercultural and identity aspects of transnational education exports/imports

-Social justice, equality and equity issues in transnational education exports/imports

-Languages in transnational education exports/imports (learning and use, hierarchies, etc.)

-Transnational education exports/imports beyond the classroom (parents, larger community, involvement of the business world)

-The use of ICT in transnational education exports/imports.

-Critical reflection on student and teacher experiences

-Critical studies on pedagogy and curriculum issues in educational exports and imports

– Employability and sustainability of education exports and imports.

 

Deadlines

Abstract of proposed chapter (300 words): 20th November 2017

Full chapters to be submitted: 15th March 2018

Authors are invited to submit a 300-word proposal (including a few lines about the author(s)) in English to both editors (fred.dervin@helsinki.fi, xiangyun@learning.aau.dk, zhao.ke@mail.shufe.edu.cn) – please no pdf!

The proposals should clearly explain the theoretical positioning and concerns of the proposed chapter, and include a short description of data (where applicable). A basic bibliography may also be added.

Journal of Bias, Identity and Diversities in Education (IJBIDE) 2(2)

Abstract Announcement for International Journal of Bias, Identity and Diversities in Education (IJBIDE) 2(2)

The contents of the latest issue of:
International Journal of Bias, Identity and Diversities in Education (IJBIDE)
Volume 2, Issue 2, July – December 2017
Published: Semi-Annually in Print and Electronically
ISSN: 2379-7363; EISSN: 2379-7355;
Published by IGI Global Publishing, Hershey, USA
www.igi-global.com/ijbide

Editor-in-Chief: Fred Dervin (University of Helsinki, Finland) and Julie Byrd Clark (Western University, Canada)

Read INTRODUCTION

Frontiers of Education in China

Critical Interculturality out on 1st August 2017

This book offers new critical insights into intercultural communication and education. It assembles previously unpublished lectures delivered in different countries (namely, Canada, China, Finland, Russia and the USA), as well as notes on intercultural events and encounters. The lectures propose conceptual, theoretical, and methodological discussions, and introduce a range of examples to encourage readers to reappraise their own ways of thinking about interculturality. The notes help readers to develop their critical and reflexive thinking. Critical Interculturality serves to fill a lacuna by helping students, practitioners, scholars and decision-makers to understand the complexities of critical interculturality. The book also stimulates discussion about the upcoming challenges in this field.

Read introduction HERE

Book out on intercultural competences

Intercultural Communication with China

A major objective of this book is to identify the key determinants of the “East” and the “West” in the field of intercultural communication. It examines but also counter-attacks essentialist and culturalist analyses of intercultural communication between China and the rest of the world. Offering a cross-country examination and comparison of drought awareness and experience, this book shows two fields of research, which are complementary but rarely found side by side, i.e. the Arts and Intercultural Encounters, serve as illustrations for theoretical and methodological discussions about intercultural communication between China and the West. Scholarly and media discourses will find this work thought-provoking, instructive and informative.

New forth. book

Book title: Critical Interculturality: Lectures and Notes (2017, Newcastle: CSP)

Series title: Post-intercultural Communication and Education

This book offers new critical and interdisciplinary insights into intercultural communication and education. It assembles previously unpublished lectures delivered in different countries (Canada, China, Finland, Russia and the USA), as well as notes on intercultural events and encounters. The lectures propose conceptual, theoretical, and methodological discussions, and introduce a range of examples to encourage readers to reappraise their own ways of thinking about interculturality. The notes help readers to develop their critical and reflexive thinking. Critical Interculturality represents an attempt to fill a lacuna by helping students, practitioners, scholars and decision-makers to understand the complexities of critical interculturality. The book also stimulates discussion about the challenges ahead.

Biodata

Fred Dervin (文德) is Professor of Multicultural Education at the University of Helsinki (Finland), where he leads the TENSION Research Group (Criticality, Interculturality and Bias in Education). Dervin has been awarded several honorary titles in Australia, Canada, China, Luxembourg, Malaysia and Sweden. He is a leading authority on multicultural/intercultural education in the world.

New book on intercultural competencies

HIGHLY recommended!

A memoir and more. Seth Polley, a once well-employed Episcopal priest, tells the story of the night he lit up to avoid burn out. Humorous and poignant, autobiographical and then some, The Vicar’s Night Out is Polley’s first foray into telling the story about what happened when Polley went green, things went south, and he wound up back in high school.

“In this moving and exciting story Seth Polley has managed to give novelty and originality to a story that is more and more common today: The experience of burnout. What makes the book original is the fact that the main character is a priest, who finds solace in marijuana. Set in Bisbee Arizona, on the border between Mexico and the US, The Vicar’s Night Out will enchant readers who know this fascinating town. Polley has a real gift of storytelling that absorbs. Definitely a writer worth following!”
Prof. Fred Dervin, University of Helsinki, Finland