Forthcoming events

January 29th, 2019
lecture hall B6

The effect of water table level on tree growth in drained peatland forests
Leena Stenberg

Insights into measuring highly variable and sporadic N2O emissions in a fertile peatland forest
Annalea Lohila

Modeling the effects of afforestation on the soil carbon stock of cultivated land in Finland
Boris Tupek

Place: Forest Sciences Building (Latokartanonkaari 7)
Time: 14.00-15.00

Events are open for everyone. No pre-registration is needed. Coffee and tee is served.

 

Abstracts:

The effect of water table level on tree growth in drained peatland forests

Ditch cleaning in drained peatland forests lowers water table and thus allows better aeration in the root zone and increases nutrient release in the soil. As a result, tree growth is improved. This presentation demonstrates a preliminary comparison of the two mechanisms on tree growth response.

Insights into measuring highly variable and sporadic N2O emissions in a fertile peatland forest

In this presentation I show multi-year results of N2O flux measurements in a fertile peatland forest using different chamber methods and analyzers. I will discuss the factors causing temporal and spatial variability in the fluxes, including the drought of summer 2018, and give a short summary of the exploitability of different methods.

Modeling the effects of afforestation on the soil carbon stock of cultivated land in Finland

Past and current agricultural use of soil leads in long-term to soil carbon loss, the source of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. In fertile land, intensive agriculture increases agricultural yields supply of which may localy compensate for environmental stress in comparison to importing the goods. However, in less fertile land, the yields may not always compensate for the soil carbon loss and for the increased economic investment into agricultural production. Furthermore, when accounting for negative environmental impact through loss of carbon from these soils, it’s worth to evaluate possible alternatives in soil management e.g extensification or even afforestation. The added value of the long-term increase in soil carbon could outweigh current economic gains and hidden environmental costs.

Here we used measured and modeled climate data, agricultural statistics, and the forest stand simulator Motti to derive input for Yasso07 soil carbon model simulations; estimates of which we verified against literature. Soil organic carbon typically increases after afforestation due to higher forest plant litter input compared to the levels of agricultural litter. The drawback is the initial stage of afforestation which represents additional soil carbon loss if plant litter totals only from tree seedlings and saplings. However, if afforestation superseds prior extensification from cropland to grassland we would gain carbon in the soil and ecosystem immeadiately. As trees grow the increased litter input reverses the soil carbon loss to carbon sink in accord with the management, tree species used and climate. OPAL Life+ project