8th March at 14:15: Pauliina Ilmonen

Our next colloquium in the spring series is by Pauliina Ilmonen from Aalto University on March 8th in Exactum E204.

Pauliina Ilmonen is a professor (tenured associate professor) in Statistics and Mathematical Data Science at Aalto University School of Science. She is also the vice head (in charge of teaching) of the Department of Mathematics and Systems Analysis. She has over a decade of teaching experience from various universities, including University of Tampere, University of Turku, Université libre de Bruxelles, and Aalto University. She teaches several bachelor’s and master’s level courses at Aalto University, and she is the responsible teacher of a minor in Statistics. She is known for her ability to discuss complicated matters in an understandable way. Pauliina Ilmonen chaired the Finnish Statistical Society from February 2018 to January 2022. She is a member of the European Regional Committee of Bernoulli Society, and she is a member of the advisory board of Statistics Finland. She loves statistics and she participates actively in public discussions related to statistics. In 2020 she received the Aalto SCI Scientific communication award.

In her research work, Pauliina Ilmonen focuses on topics in the field of mathematical statistics. Her research group’s most significant research topics are multivariate extreme value theory, invariant coordinate selection (ICS), independent component analysis (ICA), functional data analysis (FDA), change point analysis, and analysis stationary processes. Also pure mathematics is close to Pauliina’s heart. Her research group’s interest there lies on characteristics of meet and join (hyper)matrices. In addition to deriving theoretical results, her group is working on applied topics related to cancer epidemiology and the epidemiology of viruses. Doing applied work enables to contribute to research that may have significant public health implications.

Vice Head (in charge of teaching) of the Department of Mathematics and Systems Analysis

Professor (tenured Associate Professor), Statistics and Mathematical Data Science

PhD (2011, University of Tampere, Major: Biometry, Minor: Epidemiology)

https://research.aalto.fi/en/persons/pauliina-ilmonen


The title of the talk is: On extreme quantile regions

The event will take place on Friday 08.03.24  at 14:15 in Exactum E204

The event was also be streamed via Zoom: https://helsinki.zoom.us/j/61083314010

Abstract of the talk:

Modeling of rare phenomena is of paramount importance in many fields of science and wide variety of application areas of extreme value theory have multivariate problems to solve. Assessing tail behavior is challenging as, e.g., extreme quantile regions corresponding to a very small probability often contain only a few or no observations. We propose a novel affine equivariant extreme quantile region estimator for multivariate heavy-tailed elliptical variables. The estimator is constructed by extending a well-known univariate extreme quantile estimator. Consistency of the estimator is proved under estimated location and scatter. We briefly discuss the estimation of extreme quantile regions under other multivariate (and infinite dimensional) models as well.

 

26th January at 14:15: Hanna Vehkamäki

Our first colloquium in the spring series is by Hanna Vehkamäki from the University of Helsinki on January 26th.

Hanna completed her PhD in theoretical physics at the University of Helsinki 1998. After that she worked two years at University College London, UK. She returned to University of Helsinki 2000, and was appointed a professor in computational aerosol physics 2009. Since 2001 she has been leading a research group focusing on computational studies of molecular cluster formation in the atmosphere. She is the director of Research Council of Finland Centre of Excellence ‘Virtual Laboratory for Molecular Level Atmospheric Transformations’ 2022-2029. 2011 Hanna founded and then chaired the INAR (Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research) equality and well-being group until 2023, and she is currently faculty of science vice dean responsible for equality and work well-being.

The event will take place on Friday 26.1.24 at 14:15, in Chemicum A110.
The event was also be streamed via Zoom, link:
https://helsinki.zoom.us/j/65796756028

The slides of the talk are available here: Vehkamaki_fys_kollokvio_no_vid_26_1_2024

The title of her talk is: Everyday tips for implementing Kumpula code of conduct

The abstract of her talk reads:

The presentation invites you to contemplate how the Kumpula Campus Code of Conduct https://www.helsinki.fi/en/faculty-science/faculty/kumpula-campus-code-conduct and more generally values it is based on should manifest themselves in the Kumpula community – especially from the point of view the work well-being and equality. The INAR equality and work well-being group has comprised a list of everyday behavior patterns that we should pay attention to when striving to make the workplace culture welcoming to people with diverse backgrounds, and some points from this list are highlighted as examples.

8th December at 14:15: Teemu Siiskonen

The next colloquium in the fall series will take place on December 8) at 14:15. Our speaker will be Teemu Siiskonen, who has been recently appointed as the Professor of Practice at Department of Physics, University of Helsinki.

Teemu did his PhD in nuclear physics at the University of Jyväskylä. After that, he worked at CERN and Finnish Meteorological Institute before coming to STUK (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority). At STUK, he worked on the fields of radiation dosimetry, medical use of radiation, environmental surveillance, and emergency preparedness. Currently, he is a deputy director at Measurements and Environmental Monitoring department of STUK. In 2022, Teemu was appointed as the Professor of Practice at Department of Physics, University of Helsinki.

The title of his talk is: Safety and efficacy of modern radiotherapy: Techniques and development toward accurate patient-specific dosimetry.

The event will be held on Friday 08.12.23 at 14:15, in Exactum CK112.

Abstract of the talk:

Modern external beam radiotherapy techniques often rely on small, conformal dynamic beams. Many different beam qualities are used, including  photons, electrons, protons and neutrons. However, the techniques traditionally used to determine the dose may not be reliable in these beams. I will discuss recent developments to improve the accuracy of patient dose determination, with measurements in laboratory and at clinics, and using computational approaches. To avoid adverse side effects, attention must also be paid to the overall exposure of the patient, and I will discuss the methods to assess personal doses from the whole radiotherapy process, including imaging.

3rd November at 14:15: Matilda Backholm

The next colloquium in the fall series will take place on Friday (November 3) at 14:15. Our speaker will be Matilda Backholm, who is an associate professor in Soft Matter Physics at the Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, Finland.

Matilda Backholm is an assistant professor in Soft Matter Physics at the Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, Finland. Her Living Matter research team studies the mechanics, dynamics, and flow of soft, living, and fluid systems. Prof. Backholm received a BSc in Physics from the University of Helsinki (2009), a MSc in Nanoscience from Aarhus University (Denmark, 2011), and a PhD in Physics from McMaster University (Canada, 2015). Matilda then worked as an Academy of Finland postdoctoral researcher in the Soft Matter and Wetting group of Prof. Ras at Aalto University. She was recently awarded an ERC StG, a Research Council of Finland Research Fellowship, as well as grants from the Jane and Aatos Erkko Foundation and the Finnish Academy of Science and Letters.

The title of her talk is: How to swim at the mesoscale.

The event will be held on Friday 03.11.23 at 14:15, in Exactum CK112.

Abstract of the talk:

Swimming is ubiquitous in nature and crucial for the survival of many organisms. The physics behind how to swim has been extensively studied at the viscosity-dominated microscale and inertia-dominated macroscale. Between these extreme regimes lies a mesoscale that is full of interesting living organisms, such as small larvae, shrimps, and jellyfish. However, little is known about how these meso-organisms swim. Here, both viscous and inertial forces are important, rendering complicated non-linear and time-dependent effects on the meso-swimming dynamics. In this talk, I will give a background to this field and present our work on developing new experimental tools to directly measure the tiny swimming forces of mesoscale organisms. Our goal is to resolve major open questions at the mesoscale through new experimental approaches.

 

 

27th October at 14:15: Jaan Praks

The next colloquium in the fall series will take place on Friday (October 27) at 14:15. Our speaker will be Jaan Praks, who is an associate professor at the Aalto University, Finland.

Jaan Praks is an associate professor (tenured) at Aalto University who is working with small satellite and remote sensing technology. His research interests are small satellites, space technology and microwave remote sensing. Jaan Praks is the PI of the first Finnish satellite, Aalto-1 and founder/advisor in many New Space start-ups in Finland. His team is part of Finnish Centre of Excellence in Research of Sustainable Space, where Aalto is building Foresail satellites. Jaan Praks is a space enthusiast and frequent public speaker on space topics.

The title of his talk is: Quo vadis, New Space

The event will be held on Friday 27.10.23 at 14:15, in Exactum D123. The talk will also be streamed via Zoom: https://helsinki.zoom.us/j/61261922897 .